Psychological interventions for young people at risk for bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

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Psychological interventions for young people at risk for bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

J Affect Disord. 2019 Apr 09;252:84-91

Authors: Perich T, Mitchell PB

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Several studies have recently been conducted that have explored the benefits of psychological interventions in reducing symptomatology or improving outcomes in young people at-risk of developing bipolar disorder. The aim of this review was to explore if such interventions reduce current psychiatric symptoms and prevent the development of new symptoms.
METHODS: A systematic review was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Databases searched were MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 1990 until August 2018. The inclusion criteria were young people aged under 30 years with a family history of bipolar disorder and any empirical studies that contained a psychological or psychoeducation intervention.
RESULTS: A total of 7 articles (N = 138, 55 males) were included (mean age ranged from 12 to 15 years). Interventions conducted included Family Focussed Therapy, Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy, and Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Children. Significant results were found in some studies, depending on the sample's initial symptoms, with reduced time to relapse and reduced symptoms of anxiety, depression and hypo/mania being found.
LIMITATIONS: No studies have explored if interventions may delay the time to onset of first hypo/manic episodes and only two randomised controlled trials were identified.
CONCLUSIONS: Some significant results were noted with lower symptoms of anxiety, depression and hypo/mania being found in some studies. It is currently unclear if psychological interventions may prevent the development of bipolar disorder or other psychiatric symptoms over time; further longitudinal studies are required.

PMID: 30981060 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]