Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia – addressing unmet needs with partial agonists at the D2 receptor: a review.

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Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia - addressing unmet needs with partial agonists at the D2 receptor: a review.

Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2019 Aug 13;:

Authors: Mallet J, Gorwood P, Le Strat Y, Dubertret C

Abstract
Second-generation antipsychotics are common candidates for the adjunctive treatment of MDD and for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, unmet needs remain in the treatment of both disorders. Considering schizophrenia, antipsychotics are the most common treatment and have demonstrated good efficacy. Still, side effects of these treatments are commonly reported and may impact adherence to the medication and functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Regarding MDD, despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, many patients do not achieve remission. Adjunctive treatment with antipsychotics may improve clinical and functional outcomes. Compared with Dopamine D2 receptor antagonism that is exhibited by most antipsychotics, partial agonism may result in improved outcomes in MDD and in schizophrenia. Aripiprazole, cariprazine, and brexpiprazole have partial agonism at the dopamine D2 receptor, and could potentially overcome limitations associated with D2 antagonism. The objectives of this review were (i) to discuss the goal of treatment with second-generation antipsychotics in MDD and schizophrenia, and the clinical factors that should be considered and (ii) to examine the short- and long-term existing data on the efficacy and safety of D2 receptor partial agonists (aripiprazole, cariprazine, and brexpiprazole) in the adjunctive treatment of MDD and in the treatment of schizophrenia.

PMID: 31406978 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]