Clinical and demographic predictors of continuing remission or relapse following discontinuation of antipsychotic medication after a first episode of psychosis. A systematic review.

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Clinical and demographic predictors of continuing remission or relapse following discontinuation of antipsychotic medication after a first episode of psychosis. A systematic review.

Schizophr Res. 2017 Nov 13;:

Authors: Bowtell M, Ratheesh A, McGorry P, Killackey E, O'Donoghue B

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines recommend maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication for one to two years following remission of symptoms after a first episode of psychosis. However, recent research has suggested that this may not be indicated. Consistent predictors of outcome would be beneficial to guide clinicians as to which individuals are likely to have a successful discontinuation.
OBJECTIVES: This study reviews the literature with the aim of identifying demographic and clinical predictors of either relapse or continued remission in those with a first episode of psychosis following discontinuation of antipsychotic medication.
METHODOLOGY: Data Sources: A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, and PsychInfo databases was performed. Eligibility Criteria: Cohort, case-control and clinical trials that were published in English, included participants with a first episode of psychosis, and examined clinical and demographic predictors of relapse or continued remission after antipsychotic discontinuation.
RESULTS: Eleven studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. No positive findings were replicated across cohorts. Predictors of relapse: male sex, unemployment, prior psychiatric admission, premorbid adjustment, childhood isolation, premorbid functioning, schizoid-schizotypal traits, schizophrenia diagnosis, concomitant medication, and more severe negative symptoms. Some positive findings must be interpreted in the context of conflicting and replicated negative findings: sex, employment status, level of education, premorbid functioning, symptom severity, and schizophrenia diagnosis. Other replicated non-predictive findings: age, ethnicity, marital status, family history, disorganized thoughts, affective symptoms, cannabis abuse, clinical global impression, social integration, duration and dose of antipsychotic treatment, and compliance.
CONCLUSION: No positive findings have been replicated across study cohorts. Non-predictive findings have been replicated.

PMID: 29146020 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]