Does a home treatment acute relapse prevention strategy reduce admissions for people with mania in bipolar affective disorder?

Does a home treatment acute relapse prevention strategy reduce admissions for people with mania in bipolar affective disorder?

Psychiatr Bull (2014). 2014 Dec;38(6):276-80

Authors: Murton C, Cooper M, Dinniss S, Roberts S, Booth N, Newell P

Abstract
Aims and method To assess whether a home treatment team acute relapse prevention (ARP) strategy reduces admissions to hospital with mania. A retrospective design was used to analyse records for manic admissions since 2002. The number and length of admissions and detentions pre- and post-ARP were determined and rates of admissions and detentions calculated from this. Results We found reductions in admission and detention rates following the introduction of the ARP: 0.3 fewer admissions per person per year (95% bootstrap CI 0.09-0.62) and 0.25 fewer detentions per person per year (95% bootstrap CI 0.0-0.48). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave P<0.0001. Clinical implications A person-centred care plan such as the ARP which enables quick action in response to relapse-warning signs of mania appears to reduce rates of admission to hospital. The ARP could be used anywhere in the UK and fits with current mental health policy.

PMID: 25505627 [PubMed]