Utilization of Psychopharmacological Treatment Among Patients With Newly Diagnosed Bipolar Disorder From 2001 to 2010.

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Utilization of Psychopharmacological Treatment Among Patients With Newly Diagnosed Bipolar Disorder From 2001 to 2010.

J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Dec 8;

Authors: Chang CM, Wu CS, Huang YW, Chau YL, Tsai HJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine utilization and patterns of psychopharmacological treatment during a 1-year follow-up period among patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder from 2001 to 2010.
METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder from 2001 to 2010 were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We assessed prescription records related to 4 kinds of psychopharmacological medication, including antipsychotics (APs), antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and benzodiazepines, as well as health care utilization in a 1-year follow-up period among the study subjects. In addition, logistic regressions were applied to test the trends for utilization of psychopharmacological treatment during the 10-year study period.
RESULTS: A total of 2703 patients newly diagnosed with bipolar disorder were enrolled. The ratio of good adherence, defined as medications possession ratio greater than 0.8, for use of the examined psychopharmacological medication was relatively low during the study period. The use of first-generation APs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, lithium, carbamazepine, and benzodiazepines has declined; however, the use of second-generation APs, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, lamotrigine, and valproate has risen markedly during the 10-year period.
CONCLUSIONS: This study presents patterns of pharmacological treatment in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder in Taiwan for a 10-year study period. It would be of importance to further investigate causes and outcomes for polytherapy and nonadherence to psychotropic medications among patients with bipolar disorder.

PMID: 26650974 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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