Managing the side effects associated with commonly used treatments for bipolar depression.

Managing the side effects associated with commonly used treatments for bipolar depression.

J Affect Disord. 2014 Dec;169S1:S34-S44

Authors: Kemp DE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The most commonly used pharmacologic therapies for bipolar depression are mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants. This paper reviews common side effects associated with these medications and provides recommendations for managing adverse medication effects in clinical practice.
METHODS: Narrative review based on literature searches of Medline and evidence-based treatment guidelines for agents that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and/or are commonly used to treat bipolar depression.
RESULTS: Side effects of bipolar depression pharmacotherapies are common and vary by medication, with weight gain, metabolic dysregulation, sedation/somnolence, and akathisia among those observed most frequently. These adverse events (weight gain and sedation/somnolence, in particular) negatively affect treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder. Furthermore, endocrine and metabolic comorbidities, weight gain, and obesity may reduce the likelihood of positive clinical responses to pharmacologic therapies. Clinicians may consider switching patients to bipolar depression medication(s) with a lower propensity for sedation or adverse metabolic effects. Lifestyle modification (e.g., dietary changes, exercise) is an important component in the treatment of weight gain/obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia; in addition, a wide range of medications are available as therapeutic options for patients in whom non-pharmacologic management strategies are insufficient. The use of adjunctive medication may also reduce treatment-related sedation and somnolence.
LIMITATIONS: The selection of relevant studies from the literature search relied primarily on the author's expertise in the area of bipolar depression and knowledge of the issues addressed.
CONCLUSION: Successful treatment of bipolar depression extends beyond managing mood symptoms to also monitoring adverse medication events and managing associated medical disorders.

PMID: 25533913 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Managing the side effects associated with commonly used treatments for bipolar depression.

Managing the side effects associated with commonly used treatments for bipolar depression.

J Affect Disord. 2014 Dec;169S1:S34-S44

Authors: Kemp DE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The most commonly used pharmacologic therapies for bipolar depression are mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants. This paper reviews common side effects associated with these medications and provides recommendations for managing adverse medication effects in clinical practice.
METHODS: Narrative review based on literature searches of Medline and evidence-based treatment guidelines for agents that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and/or are commonly used to treat bipolar depression.
RESULTS: Side effects of bipolar depression pharmacotherapies are common and vary by medication, with weight gain, metabolic dysregulation, sedation/somnolence, and akathisia among those observed most frequently. These adverse events (weight gain and sedation/somnolence, in particular) negatively affect treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder. Furthermore, endocrine and metabolic comorbidities, weight gain, and obesity may reduce the likelihood of positive clinical responses to pharmacologic therapies. Clinicians may consider switching patients to bipolar depression medication(s) with a lower propensity for sedation or adverse metabolic effects. Lifestyle modification (e.g., dietary changes, exercise) is an important component in the treatment of weight gain/obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia; in addition, a wide range of medications are available as therapeutic options for patients in whom non-pharmacologic management strategies are insufficient. The use of adjunctive medication may also reduce treatment-related sedation and somnolence.
LIMITATIONS: The selection of relevant studies from the literature search relied primarily on the author's expertise in the area of bipolar depression and knowledge of the issues addressed.
CONCLUSION: Successful treatment of bipolar depression extends beyond managing mood symptoms to also monitoring adverse medication events and managing associated medical disorders.

PMID: 25533913 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]