Identifying clinical net benefit of psychotropic medication use with latent variable techniques: Evidence from Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD).

Identifying clinical net benefit of psychotropic medication use with latent variable techniques: Evidence from Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD).

J Affect Disord. 2018 May 29;238:147-155

Authors: Bareis N, Lu J, Kirkwood CK, Kornstein SG, Wu E, Mezuk B

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Poor medication adherence is common among individuals with Bipolar Disorder (BD). Understanding the sources of heterogeneity in clinical net benefit (CNB) and how it is related to psychotropic medications can provide new insight into ways to improve adherence.
METHODS: Data come from the baseline assessments of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD). Latent class analysis identified groups of CNB, and validity of this construct was assessed using the SF-36. Adherence was defined as taking 75% or more of medications as prescribed. Associations between CNB and adherence were tested using multiple logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.
RESULTS: Five classes of CNB were identified: High (24%), Moderately high (12%), Moderate (26%), Moderately low (27%) and Low (12%). Adherence to psychotropic medications did not differ across classes (71% to 75%, χ2 = 3.43, p = 0.488). Medication regimens differed by class: 57% of the High CNB were taking ≤2 medications, whereas 49% of the Low CNB were taking ≥4. CNB classes had good concordance with the SF-36.
LIMITATIONS: Missing data limited measures used to define CNB. Participants' perceptions of their illness and treatment were not assessed.
CONCLUSIONS: This novel operationalization of CNB has construct validity as indicated by the SF-36. Although CNB and polypharmacy regimens are heterogeneous in this sample, adherence is similar across CNB. Studying adherent individuals, despite suboptimal CNB, may provide novel insights into aspects influencing adherence.

PMID: 29883936 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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