Comparison of the Quality of Life, Perceived Stigma and Medication Adherence of Chinese with Schizophrenia: A Follow-Up Study.

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Comparison of the Quality of Life, Perceived Stigma and Medication Adherence of Chinese with Schizophrenia: A Follow-Up Study.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2016 Feb;30(1):41-6

Authors: Wang XQ, Petrini M, Morisky DE

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The community-based mental health services were encouraged to improve the quality of life for individuals with chronic mental disorders in Mainland China. This study aims to explore how the quality of life, perceived stigma, and medication adherence differ among a Chinese population with schizophrenia prior to and one-month following discharge.
METHOD: One hundred and twenty-eight Chinese people with schizophrenia completed the self-report scales: the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS), the Link' Stigma Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) prior to discharge and at one month after discharge. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a paired sample t-test.
RESULTS: The findings of SQLS demonstrate deterioration on psychosocial and motivation/energy domain (P<0.001) accompanied by improvement of symptom/side effect (P<0.05) after discharge. The scores of perceived stigma and actual stigma coping orientations (P<0.001) after discharge were found to be significantly higher than before discharge. Medication adherence was significantly reduced after discharge than before discharge (P<0.001).
CONCLUSION: The results of this study provide implications for clinical practices, such as provision of psychosocial and educational rehabilitation programs for individuals who are in a stable mental status and plan to discharge; and to provide effective family education in order to improve family coping strategies and caring capabilities when patients return to the community. The findings provide important policy implications as well to facilitate individuals with schizophrenia to reintegrate into the community and benefit from a favorable QOL.

PMID: 26804500 [PubMed - in process]

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